History - Town of Dickinson

The town’s namesake is for Daniel S. Dickinson – Binghamton’s first mayor in 1834. He served as lieutenant governor of New York State from 1842-1844 and as the only person from Broome County as a U.S. Senator, 1844-1851. During the Civil war he was appointed as the U.S. attorney for the New York City area. A statue of him stands in the front of the Broome County Courthouse, erected in 1924.

Dickinson is the youngest of the towns of Broome County, 1890. But, it is home of the first settlement located on the western side of the Chenango River, 1787, by Captain William Leonard, Colonel William Rose, Joshua Whitney, his son Joshua William, and Ebenezer Greene. A New York State marker north of the entrance to Sunrise Terrace tells of the first court held under an elm tree near the Whitney farm.

The 3.4 square miles of the town was a part of the Town of Chenango. When the Town of Chenango was divided this area became a part of the Town of Binghamton. The village of Binghamton became the City of Binghamton in 1867 and continually grew its boundaries until it cut the Town of Binghamton into two parts. The northern part officially became the Town of Dickinson in 1890. Inhabitants at that time numbered 525 which included the County’s Poor Farm.

 

Town of Dickinson’s Officials – 1891 to Present (2017)

Dickinson is the county’s youngest town with its first board meeting held in January of 1891. Since this time there have been 16 supervisors. The average tenure of our supervisors has been five years. There are two supervisors who greatly exceeded this average. Edwin M. Jones served into his 32cd year. Current supervisor, Michael Marinaccio, is serving his 19th year with an additional four years as a councilman.

The office of Town Clerk has seen 12 people serve the Town. M. Ruth DeSilva served 24 years in this capacity. The average length of service for a town clerk has been nine years. 

The office of Coucilman/Councilwoman is relatively new. The Town transitioned from Justices of the Peace to Councilman/Councilwoman beginning in 1949 as voting members of the Town’s board. Joseph Burczak was the first elected person to hold the office of Councilman. Current board member, Danny Moribito, is the longest tenured councilman with 27 years and counting. Of the justices, there have been 32 judges having an average tenure of just over 11 years. Judges Samuel H. Decker and Annette Slocum both served the town for 34 years.

 

Supervisors Years  Dates
James M. Holt, Jr 4 1891, 1899-01
Frank W. Jewell 2 1892-93
John W. Cutler 4.5 1894-95, 1905-07
Marquis L. Jones 6 1896-98, 1902-04
Fred A. Wilcox 3.5 1908-10
Henry M. Macumber 6 1911-14, 1917-18
Charles M. Johnson 7 1915-16, 1920-23
Clarence L. Chamberlain 5 1924-28
Andrew Dewing 2 1929-30
Edwin M. Jones 31 1931-61
Stanley H. Jones 6 1962-67
J. Kent Blair 9 1968-76
James Wahl 6 1977-82
John R. Conklin 6 1983-88
Don Moran 8 1989-96
Michael Marinaccio 20… 1997-

Town Clerk Years  Dates
Edward H. Smith 3 1891-93
Frank S. Nash 1 1894
Dennison J. Nash 1 1895
Fred A. Wilcox 9 1896-1904
George Newton 5.75 1905-09
Addison L. Wilcox 23.25 1909-32
N. D. Clearwater 12 1933-37
William H. Hanley 11 1938-48
Andrew Dewing 22 1949-70
M. Ruth DeSilva 24 1971-94
Cheryl DePofi 16 1995-2010
Wanda Broczkowski 5 2011-2015
Susan M. Cerretani 2... 2015 (5/6) -


Justices Years Dates
Philip Champlin 13 1891-1902
John Rozelle 1 1891
Charles Bronson 1 1891
F. W. Jewell 2 1891-92
Willis Palmer 4 1892-95
Issac H. Egbert 20 1892-1910
Benjamin F. Bradley 7 1896-1902
L. W. Rummer 1 1896
John W. Cutler 4 1897-1900
M. L. Jones 1 1901
Marquis L. Hickox 18 1904-12
Robert Mungle 20 1903-22
Charles Lewis 1 1903
George W. Bennett 1 1902
Edwin D. Hunt 12 1903-14
Charles M. Johnson 4 1911-14
Samuel H. Decker 34 1913-20, 1923-48
Fred A. Wilcox 19 1915-33
Edward L. Ingersall 2 1921-22
Clarence Chamberlain 3 1923-25
Ford E. Mulford 49 1926-74
Thomas Beaty 9 1933-41
Victor H. Brink 17 1934-50
Stephen Mitchell 27 1942-68
William C. Burtis, Jr. 7 1969-75
Frank E. Thomas, Jr. 22 1979-96
Willard R. Bowers 3 1976-78
Gregory Gates 18 1997-2014
Annette Slocum 34 1979-2013
Linda L. Cooper 4... 2013-
Thomas R. Cline 3... 2014-


Council Years  Dates
 
Joseph Burczak 20 1949-68
Victor H. Brink 4 1951-54
Stanley Jones 7 1955-61
C. Fred Jenks 9 1962-70
Vernon Williams 6 1969-74
Don Kumpon 26 1971-90, 1997-2003
Patricia McCord 1 1975
Philip Johnson 1 1976
Thomas Bowers 4 1977-80
Don Moran 10 1979-88
John Robert  Conklin 2 1981-82, 1993-96
Ronald Snyder 4 1981-84
Francis Mica 6 1983-88
Joseph Farrell 9 1985-88, 1990-94
Burton Tessitore 1 1989
Edward M. Sloma 4 1989-92
Danny Morabito 28... 1989- 
Michael Marinaccio 4 1991-94
Thomas Burns  22... 1995-
Sharon Exley 22... 1995-
Joel Kie 3 2004-06
Stephen M. Gardner 10... 2007-

Superintendent of Highway Years Dates
Commissioner of Highway
Perry E. Cutler 1 1891
Erastis W. Smith 1 1892
John W. Cutler 1 1893
Porter B. Hatch 13 1894-98, 1903-10, 1913-14
George W. Bennett 2 1898-1900
J. T. Rozelle 2 1901-02
Everett Balch 2 1911-12
Harry Luddington 4 1915-18
George Van Wagner 6 1919-1924
Charles M. Johnson 4 1925-26, 1929-1930
Joseph Finlayson 2 1927-28
Dwight M. Merrill 20 1931-1950
Victor Vaccaro 27 1951-1977
John Mitacek 3 1978-1980
George Noble Dean 2 1981-82
Joseph Winterstein 20 1983-2002
Don Kumpon 3 2003-2005
Joel Kie 11... 2006 -

 

Sunrise Terrace
One of the first planned suburban communities
of Broome County

Adams Drive is one of the streets of Sunrise Terrace and is named for its original developer, Albert C. Adams, Sr. He came to Binghamton from Illinois in 1921. Soon afterwards he purchased the English farm from Mr. and Mrs. Levi English. The English farm house stood where present day Econolodge is located on Old Front Street. This property was owned by Joshua Whitney, who settled here in 1787 and is one of the first settlers of the area. The first court of the area was held across the street from Whitney’s home under an Elm tree. A marker designates this spot. Hence the Town’s logo is of an Elm tree.

Part of the Sunrise Terrace’s land was deeded by Polly and Graves Collins of Whitney Point to John W. Cutler in 1858.  Another parcel acquired by J. W. Cutler was from the estate of Minerva Case, 1861, (a portion of this estate was left by J. W. Cutler in 1875 to William D. and Philander Cutler). 1871 saw Mr. and Mrs. John W. Cutler deed a parcel to Watson Curtis to establish a boundary line and border the County farm. After the accidental death of both Mr. and Mrs. Cutler, the remainder of the property was left to their daughters, Mildred L. and Martha M. In 1912 they gave land to Mary V. Cutler. Mary also received land from her husband, Philander Cutler. Part of Mary Cutler’s estate was deeded to Mr. and Mrs. Seeber Hibbard in 1923. Then in 1925 Albert Adams bought the Hibbard portion of the Cutler farm. Now Adams has the English farm (from Whitney) and the Hibbard farm (from Cutler).

To create the planned suburban area of Sunrise Terrace, Mr. Adams hired engineers, Hoadley and Giles to make a topographical map of both farms. He also hired, landscape architect, Joseph Porter at Cornell University. Porter was to make a practical, attractive, and unusual layout for the development. The name “Sunrise Terrace” was used for this development after a trip to Texas where both Albert and Edith Adams saw a beautiful development named, Sunrise Terrace.  Further, the sun also rises on the new project.

Homes to be built had to have a minimum price tag of $4,000. The development was to be only residential in nature. The first homes built in the Sunrise Terrace proper were for Mr. Payne and Mrs. Briggs. Further, the house on Front Street formerly owned by Herman Dibbles was the remodeled tenant home on the Hibbard farm. It was designed and demonstrated by the Broome County Home Bureau. Another rebuilt home was the former carriage house at 835 Front Street. Unique to this suburban area is its community center. The Sunrise Terrace Association was started in the late 1930’s and continues today. Its current building was dedicated in 1956 and remains the largest project the association has done.

Sunrise Terrace was the site of one of the first WPA projects. The work was to be on the upper part of Terrace Drive and create a road to the 9-hole golf course at Ely Park. Land was given by Albert Adams to the city of Binghamton to expand the 9-hole course to 18-holes. The project road has since disappeared due to not being maintained.

 

Fun Facts